The Red Queen Kills Seven Times

As with his previous film, Miraglia takes the modern setting integral to the spirit of gialli and dresses it up in a bit of old-fashioned Gothic spookiness by, once again, setting a portion of it in a moody Gothic estate full of dark secret passages and dungeon chambers.

Devil in the Brain

Sergio Sollima didn’t direct very many films. His career is split fairly evenly between theatrical and televised fare. Devil in the Brain is not what anyone would consider a technically outstanding movie, but it is solid in its craftsmanship.

The Sister of Ursula

The Sister of Ursula is like watching a Jess Franco film without that director’s flare. Contemplate that one on the Tree of Woe. Sex scenes, the Italian coast, outlandish murders — everything about The Sister of Ursula seems to operate under the directive of “Well, this should be good, but we’re going to mess it up.”

Eye in the Labyrinth

With Eye in the Labyrinth, Caiano demonstrates a sure hand in orchestrating his players, staging the action in striking tableaux, and allowing his creative muscles to stretch.

Hatchet for the Honeymoon

Hatchet for the Honeymoon is not the kind of film to watch for a kill count or ingenuous murders. It is the kind of film to watch for paranormal and sartorial phenomena, ghosts, discotheques, mysterious deaths, horrifying old toys, and the narration of a “paranoiac.”

Paris After Midnight

Musidora wears this maillot de soie sporadically, a few minutes spread throughout the serial’s nearly seven hours, yet that is – not undeservedly – the indelible iconic image not just of Les Vampires, but of Louis Feuillade’s entire filmography.

Who Saw Her Die?

Creating an emotional attachment to the characters and a sympathetic reaction to the violence against them isn’t a giallo priority. Who Saw Her Die? is the rare giallo that attempts and succeeds this, thanks to a committed performance by former James Bond, George Lazenby.

The Case of the Bloody Iris

When it comes to truly loathsome characters in a giallo, few can match Giuliano Carnimeo’s The Case of the Bloody Iris, a film in which pretty much everyone is hateful, stupid, or more often, hateful and stupid.

Mary and the Monster

At first, Frankenstein plays it coy. After the creation scene, we see the monster only as a horrifying, dead-looking, clawed arm slowly reaching out from behind a heavy metal door.

An Exercise in Puerile Barbarity

Strange things were happening on the streets of Paris in 1913. In February, trials began for the surviving members of the infamous Bonnot Gang, a group of murderers and anarchists who cut a swathe of criminal terror across France and Belgium.

The Bloodstained Butterfly

The Bloodstained Butterfly is the odd giallo where the police seem dedicated to their job. Although it boasts the elaborate murders and cast of red herrings one expects from the genre, it also surprises by spending at least as much time on police procedure, forensic science, and courtroom maneuvering.

The Forbidden Photos of a Lady Above Suspicion

Forbidden Photos concerns itself with only one murder, rather than a series of them, which might, for some, put it at a distance from the giallo genre as a whole. If you are someone who comes to giallo cinema primarily for its stylized violence that will likely be the case.

The Night Evelyn Came Out of the Grave

Alan is a handsome aristocrat who enjoys velvet jackets, cravats, and murdering strippers. He marries a woman in hopes she will curb his homicidal outbursts, and his creepy estate is soon haunted by the ghost of his former wife.

All the Colors of the Dark

All the Colors of the Dark works within the confines of the giallo, but it takes the genre further afield than had previously been explored, resulting in a dizzying psychedelic combination of straight-forward stalker/murder mystery, hallucinogenic psycho-sexual exploration, and straight up occult/devil worship horror.

Strip Nude for Your Killer

Even though it’s poorly written, relentlessly tasteless, has very few good points other than Edwige Fenech, and is packed full of gratuitously seedy garbage, Strip Nude for Your Killer entertains on that level that might make you feel like you need a shower afterward.

The Bird with the Crystal Plumage

The Bird with the Crystal Plumage is the one that cemented the giallo’s tropes: the elaborate title, the artist protagonist thrust into the role of amateur sleuth, a sinister killer in black gloves, bizarre supporting characters, brutal murders, hyper-stylized art design.