The Case of the Bloody Iris

When it comes to truly loathsome characters in a giallo, few can match Giuliano Carnimeo’s The Case of the Bloody Iris, a film in which pretty much everyone is hateful, stupid, or more often, hateful and stupid.

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The Bloodstained Butterfly

The Bloodstained Butterfly is the odd giallo where the police seem dedicated to their job. Although it boasts the elaborate murders and cast of red herrings one expects from the genre, it also surprises by spending at least as much time on police procedure, forensic science, and courtroom maneuvering.

The Invisible Man vs. the Human Fly

While it might have been cool to watch the invisible man square off against a traditional Japanese ghost or yokai, in the end it was obvious that the only fitting opponent for an invisible man is the invisible man’s natural enemy: a tiny flying hitman.

The Night Evelyn Came Out of the Grave

Alan is a handsome aristocrat who enjoys velvet jackets, cravats, and murdering strippers. He marries a woman in hopes she will curb his homicidal outbursts, and his creepy estate is soon haunted by the ghost of his former wife.

Invisible Man

When news of the invisible man spreads across town, Yajima hatches a scheme to capitalize on the warning that another invisible man is out there. He dresses his gang up in the iconic Claude Raines style overcoat and face bandages and has them rob banks and race tracks while claiming to be invisible men themselves

Invisible Man Appears

Invisible Man Appears is, like some of the Universal sequels, more of a crime drama than it is a horror or science fiction film, though there are enough beakers and wild white Albert Einstein hair to give it a reasonable claim to scifi.

Martini and Myth

The Martini has been around since the mid-to-late 1800s. Its life has spanned the Industrial Revolution, two world wars, Prohibition, the Great Depression, the Summer of Love, disco, punk, and Hammer Pants. It has been in style, out of fashion, and subject to the peculiar and not always trustworthy whims of the American drinker.

The Man Who Almost Composed Bond

Towering above all others in the realm of Bond cash-in albums, however, was British composer Roland Shaw, who released a series of James Bond cash-in records that featured arrangements of Bond themes and background music that were often just as good as the originals, and in some cases, perhaps even better.

Lady Day on Swing Street

There are few moments more perfect than walking into a bar late at night and hearing a Billie Holiday song. They’re practically made for ordering an Old Fashioned as you prop your elbows up on the bar and think about lost loves and life’s regrets.

All the Colors of the Dark

All the Colors of the Dark works within the confines of the giallo, but it takes the genre further afield than had previously been explored, resulting in a dizzying psychedelic combination of straight-forward stalker/murder mystery, hallucinogenic psycho-sexual exploration, and straight up occult/devil worship horror.

I Spit On Your Grave

Adaptations of books have a long history of being derided by theauthor, but few have as dramatic a claim to this dubious honor as this adaptation of Boris Vian’s J’irai cracher sur vos tombes. Vian stood up minutes into the premiere screening to shout his disapproval. He then, suddenly, dropped dead.

The Chairman, The Poet, and The Dancer

West 52nd Street between Broadway and 8th Ave. is one of those anonymous blocks that seems to offer little. But tucked in there is a piano bar and restaurant called Russian Samovar. It used to be called Jilly’s Saloon, where Frank Sinatra held court.

Strip Nude for Your Killer

Even though it’s poorly written, relentlessly tasteless, has very few good points other than Edwige Fenech, and is packed full of gratuitously seedy garbage, Strip Nude for Your Killer entertains on that level that might make you feel like you need a shower afterward.

The Bird with the Crystal Plumage

The Bird with the Crystal Plumage is the one that cemented the giallo’s tropes: the elaborate title, the artist protagonist thrust into the role of amateur sleuth, a sinister killer in black gloves, bizarre supporting characters, brutal murders, hyper-stylized art design.

Deadly Sweet

Deadly Sweet was inspired by Blow Up, but it lacks that film’s disillusionment. Tinto Brass thinks Swinging London is still swinging. Thus he turns in a decidedly less somber film despite a somewhat downbeat conclusion.

Blow-Up

In a sense, Antonioni has made a movie about the movie he is making, and his final conclusion, if it is indeed a conclusion, is a bit sad. Thomas chases the meaning of the photographs he has taken, but he never gets there. In the end, everything he has done vanishes.